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Publications tagged with [DEM (Digital Elevation Model)]

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The development of susceptibility maps for debris flows is of primary importance due to population pressure in hazardous zones. However, hazard assessment by processbased modelling at a regional scale is difficult due to the complex nature of the phenomenon, ...
Filed under: Rock Mechanics -  Rock Falls
Reference: Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 13, 869–885, 2013
Rockfall propagation areas can be determined using a simple geometric rule known as shadow angle or energy line method based on a simple Coulomb frictional model implemented in the CONEFALL computer program. Runout zones are estimated from a digital terrain ...
Filed under: Rock Mechanics -  Rock Falls
Reference: Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 11, 819–828, 2011
In this paper, a DEM-based (Digital Elevation Models) geomorphometric approach is presented for detecting potential rockfall sources.
Filed under: Rock Mechanics -  Rock Falls
Reference: Nat. Hazards Earth Syst. Sci., 9, 1643-1653, 2009
Debris flow susceptibility mapping at a regional scale has been the subject of various studies. The complexity of the phenomenon and the variability of local controlling factors limit the use of process-based models for a first assessment. GIS-based approaches ...
Reference: 4th Canadian Conference on Geohazards : From Causes to Management, J. Locat, D. Perret, D. Turmel, D. Demers et S. Leroueil
A factor limiting preliminary rockfall hazard mapping at regional scale is often the lack of knowledge of potential source areas. Nowadays, high resolution topographic data (LiDAR) can account for realistic landscape details even at large scale. With such ...
Filed under: Rock Mechanics -  Rock Falls
Reference: Proceedings of the 4th Canadian Conference on Geohazards : From Causes to Management. Presse de l’Université Laval, Québec, 594 p.
A factor limiting preliminary rockfall hazard mapping at regional scale is often the lack of knowledge of potential source areas. Nowadays, high resolution topographic data (LiDAR) can account for realistic landscape details even at large scale. With such ...
Filed under: Rock Mechanics -  Rock Falls
Reference: 4th Canadian Conference on Geohazards : From Causes to Management
The 30 M m<sup>3</sup> rockslide that occurred on the east face of Turtle Mountain in the Crowsnest Pass area (Alberta) in 1903 is one of the most famous landslides in the world. In this paper, the structural features of the South part of Turtle Mountain are ...
Reference: 4th Canadian Conference on Geohazards : From Causes to Management, J. Locat, D. Perret, D. Turmel, D. Demers et S. Leroueil
Detailed 1:10,000 scale engineering geological mapping of Pietermaritzburg covered an area of approximately 670km<sup>2</sup>, some of which is experiencing rapid growth and development across a geologically<br>varied area. This variation has resulted in a ...
Reference: The 10th IAEG International Congress, Nottingham, United Kingdom, 6-10 September 2006, Paper number 407
Engineering geologists now have at their disposal a wide variety of imaging techniques and technologies available for rapid terrain evaluation and assessment. These techniques include the use of remotely sensed data sets, traditional aerial photography, geophysical ...
Reference: The 10th IAEG International Congress, Nottingham, United Kingdom, 6-10 September 2006, Paper number 245
Landslide incidence in urban areas of the city of Granada, and the main towns of the province with more than 20 000 inhabitants, is here analysed following a methodology based on the following steps: collection of information about historical or antecedent ...
Reference: The 10th IAEG International Congress, Nottingham, United Kingdom, 6-10 September 2006, Paper number 414